facendo la premessa

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cfareddollas

Senior Member
English (UK)
Ciao a tutti!
Please help, I am not legally-minded and have to translate a brief contract.
I'm not sure I've understood this:
"Tutto ciò premesso e facendo la premessa parte integrante del presente atto si stipula e si conviene quanto segue: [...]"
My attempt:
"Now, therefore and given that the preamble forms an integral part of this deed, the following points are drafted and agreed: [...]"
 
  • cfareddollas

    Senior Member
    English (UK)
    grazie gandolfo!
    That seems like a good way of putting it. I just wasn't too sure whether I had understood the meaning of "premessa" in the context but what you're saying makes sense.
     

    des_grieux

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Hello everyone!

    I am trying to translate a rather frequent Italian phrase, that unfortunately has no equally frequent equivalent in English:

    "Faccio una premessa".

    I have read the existing threads about "premessa", but they either discuss a situation where the word appears in a written formal context, or specifically refer to the use of "premessa" as one of the opening pages of a book. My "faccio una premessa" appears in spoken Italian. This sentence is used in a dialogue between two speakers discussing business matters, but the dialogue is nevertheless quite informal. The sentence that comes immediately after is as follows:

    "Non siamo qui per capire le vostre esigenze, le vostre istanze, quanto per risolvere alcune nostre problematiche interne."

    My translation is not too literal, as I was afraid the sentence would sound too awkward in English:

    "Let me make an introductory remark."

    However, this sentence takes for granted that the speaker is introducing a long speech, whereas in actual fact this sentence appears right in the middle of a very long conversation, so as it is the translation is a bit out of context.

    Do you have any other suggestions? All your help will be greatly appreciated!
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    I was just on holiday with an Italian friend and he asked me about this phrase. After some consideration, I think we'd just leave it out and get to the sentence without any preamble. Perhaps at best we might say "If I may, we are here to..." or maybe "What I wanted to say was, we are here to..."
     

    des_grieux

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I think both of you made a very interesting point. AlabamaBoy, I think you found extremely plausible contextual equivalents that manage to steer clear of adhering too closely to the Italian, and in fact they fit the context I mentioned perfectly. But I would also agree with rrose17; I think this phrase very often - though not always! - is no more that a sort of "attention catcher", a pragmatic mechanism of asking for more attention from the interlocutor.

    Thank you both for you insights!
     

    MR1492

    Senior Member
    English -USA
    It sounds like what is known in speech therapy as a "speech filler.". Much like the quintessential American phrases "you know" and "like", they serve as transition phrases between thoughts.
     

    musetto

    New Member
    Italian
    Actually, it is not a "speech filler" but, as it was suggested by AlabamaBoy, the speaker (or the writer) wants to state something happened previously or something that must be clear to the addressee otherwise what follows may be misunderstood or could not be fully understood.
    In contracts, there may be explanations which are related to the topic of the contract.

    I hope this example can be useful.
    A person could say: "Faccio una premessa" that is "Before we go any further, let me make something clear". From now on, I just keep writing in English. The same person continues: "My property is formed by a main building with a large garden, a garage and a hut used to store tools and other material. All this will be referred as the 'house'. One day ...".
    The addressee now knows that the "garage" is detached from the main building when the speaker says: "... I was in my house watching TV and I suddenly realized that I left the parcel in the car. So, I went and took it. While I was unwrapping it my wife began screaming at me because I dirtied the floor with mud."
    At least in Italy, the garage is part of the house. Without the initial explanation, the addresses could be puzzled: "How is it possible that he messed up the floor if he just went to the garage?"
     

    Uncle Tony

    New Member
    Italian
    In current legal English, the "premesse del contratto", i.e. the preliminary statements contained in a contract before the regularly numbered and capitalized sections (those after the names of the parties to the contract and before the expression "now therefore ....." or the like) are normally called "recitals"
     
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