estimar una demanda

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coquinne

Member
español-España
Buenas tardes!

¿Alguien me puede ayudar a traducir lo siguiente?:

"Adjunto acompaño sentencia dictada por el juzgado de lo mercantil nº 4, en la cual se estima íntegramente la demanda interpuesta, condenando a la demandada a pagar 30.000 euros"

He intentado hacerlo yo, pero no lo tengo muy claro, éste ha sido el resultado:

I send you enclosed the Sentence passed by the Mercantile Court number 4, which considers the lawsuit brought and condemns the defendant to pay 30.000 euros.

Muchas gracias.
 
  • Dani California

    Senior Member
    Spain, Spanish
    Buenas tardes!

    ¿Alguien me puede ayudar a traducir lo siguiente?:

    "Adjunto acompaño sentencia dictada por el juzgado de lo mercantil nº 4, en la cual se estima íntegramente la demanda interpuesta, condenando a la demandada a pagar 30.000 euros"

    He intentado hacerlo yo, pero no lo tengo muy claro, éste ha sido el resultado:

    I send you enclosed the Sentence passed by the Mercantile Court number 4, which considers the lawsuit brought and condemns the defendant to pay 30.000 euros.

    Muchas gracias.
    Hola,
    Yo diría para aludir a la estimación de la demanda: judgment was for the plaintiff or the judgment uphold/upheld the lawsuit or the Court rules for the plaintiff, so:
    I send you enclosed the Sentence passed, in which the Mercantile Court number 4, rules for the plaintiff/uphold the lawsuit filed by the plaintiff, and condemns the defendant to pay the sume of 30.000 euros.
    Saludos
     

    Dani California

    Senior Member
    Spain, Spanish
    Hola
    Creo que en este caso el término adecuado a emplear es condemn y no order, por cuanto en España (la sentencia dimana de un Juzgado español)los Juzgados y tribunales, también en los procedimientos civiles, condenan en sus fallos (no ordenan), entiendo que sucede lo mismo en otros países europeos, cuyas sentencias han sido traducidas al inglés y se emplea el verbo condenar y no ordenar.
    Si eres tan amable de echar un vistazo a estos links:
    http://www.greenpeace.org/raw/content/usa/press/reports/court-ruling-on-stopesso-logo.pdf
    En este fallo de la sentencia del Tribunal de Apelación de París:
    ON THESE GROUNDS
    Overrules the order and rules again:
    Rejects the ESSO Company’s requests,
    Condemns the ESSO Company to pay the GREENPEACE FRANCE Association the
    sum of 2000 euros in accordance with article 700 of the New Civil Procedure
    Code,
    Orders the ESSO Company to pay costs,
    http://www.cisg.law.pace.edu/cases/010329f1.html
    http://www.ewc-service.org/upload/companies/ba/barulingen.pdf
    Saludos
     

    the boss

    Banned
    Mexico
    Sorry. You are right. No importa que sea francés. Nada que ver con lo que se emplea en tribunales norteamericanos. Disculpa. Estás en lo correcto.
     

    Smitch18

    Senior Member
    English, U.K.
    The potential problem with taking a translated sample from a French court is that the translation used as a guide may be faulty to begin with. It may have been translated by a less than competent or lazy native English speaker or it may have been translated by a French native speaker. EU documents are replete with less than natural or simply wrong translations - with 'actual' perhaps being the most common of them. 'Ordered to pay costs' is the usual term in English.
     

    Joe Esquire

    Senior Member
    Spanish Spain- English US
    Coquine, if this is to be used/read in the US, please consider the following:

    1. The matter is obviously a civil matter (Mercantile) as in commercial law, and thus the terminology should follow the procedural language used in those courts.
    2. Courts in the US issue: Decisions, Holdings and Rulings. A Judgement has a specialized meaning for a few particular procedures which are generally not final, such as Summary Judgment, Consent Judgment, or Default Judgment.
    3. In civil cases, Courts do not rule against parties (plaintiff or defendant), they rule in favor of parties.
    4. the term “Sentence” only applies to one phase of a criminal process pertaining to deprivation of liberty. It is not the equivalent of “Sentencia”.
    5. The term “condemn” does not mean “condemnar” . It pertains to deeming a building/structure to no longer be habitable, and set for destruction.

    With all that in mind, a literal translation would not read well, I would say:
    “Enclosed please find the Decision issued by the Mercantile Court No.4, which upon due consideration rules in favor of the plaintiff in the sum of 30,000 euros.”

    (me dices si prefieres el análisis en castellano) Saludos.
     
    Last edited:

    Joe Esquire

    Senior Member
    Spanish Spain- English US
    As I said above, while one may wish to translate literally, it may often result in redundancy as the award (in the translated version) is inclusive of the order to pay. Also a ”respondent” is generally an appellate term. From what I can discern, this case is not an appellate case.

    Regards,
     
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