Er gehört zu den Guten.

< Previous | Next >
What is the antonym of "gehören"?: What verb do you put to fill in the blank of "Die Guten ... ihn." when you want to say the same thing as "Er gehört zu den Guten [Leuten]."? Is it "enthalten," "einschließen mit," or what?
Was it right to call such semantic relation antonymous? Is there another term for it?
 
Last edited:
  • Kajjo

    Senior Member
    Usually antonyms describes a pair of terms with opposite meanings to each other.

    There is the special (but relatively unknown) term converses or converse antonyms to describe a pair of terms that view the same relationship from an opposite perspective, for example buy/sell, lend/borrow.

    In your case with persons belonging to a group, there is no good solution that comes to my mind spontaneously.

    We would always try to twist the sentence so that "gehören" can be used.
     
    @kimko_379
    Is that an exercise from a book?
    No, sir. I just wished to know the semantic contents of the grammatical-cases fused/combined/unified in

    "Die Jugend (N) ist schön (N and D or L, because the predicate is semantically equivalent to/with "gehört zu schönen Sachen.)."

    and

    "Schön (N and what?) ist die Jugend (N and what?)."

    where N = nominative, D = dative, and L = (abstract) locative, in the case above: showing a place in the logical space/Raum or a set/Menge.
     
    Die Jugend = subject, nominative
    ist schön = predicate

    ist = finite verb of the predicate
    schön = predicative, uninflected (identical to nominative)


    Exactly as above. The word order does not change the grammatical functions and declinations.
    Yes, but I would like to know the inner SEMANTICAL/cognitive cases structures, not the syntactical cases structures..
    What I mean by semantics above is the following (b)'s:
    Geoffrey Leech: "Semantic"-mentioned (a) deep semantics and (b) shallow semantics
    Wolfgang Wildgen: "The Catastrophe-Theoretical Semantics"-named (a) cognitive structures and (b) language structures
    Tsugio Sekiguchi-called (a) imi-naiyoo = Bedeutungs-Inhalte = fuhen-teki-imi-keitai = universelle Bedeutungs-(Erscheinungs-)Formen = universal human Denkweisen and (b) kobetsu-teki imi-keitai = einzelsprachige Bedeutungs-(Erscheinungs-)Formen = language-specific/einzelsprachige Denkweisen
     
    Last edited:

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    What is the antonym of "gehören"?: What verb do you put to fill in the blank of "Die Guten ... ihn." when you want to say the same thing as "Er gehört zu den Guten [Leuten]."? Is it "enthalten," "einschließen mit," or what?
    Was it right to call such semantic relation antonymous? Is there another term for it?
    Hi, there is no one word antonym. But "gehören nicht/nicht gehören" as negation is a kind of antonym.


    "Er gehört zu den Guten [Leuten]. " -> Er gehört nicht zu den Guten.
    But there is a real antonym here: gut-schlecht.
    "Er gehört zu den Schlechten".


    "Die Guten schließen ihn ein" is possible but not idiomatic in our context. "Umschließen" is possible in other context.
    Die Guten schließen ihn ein. - This is blocked in our context because of the homonym jemanden einschließen=to lock in somebody.


    In our context it is (see Duden | umschließen | Rechtschreibung, Bedeutung, Definition, Herkunft) "einschließen, in sich begreifen, zum Inhalt haben".
    But it does not work well.

    A possible sentence is "Das Gute schließt das Böse (in sich) ein. (a paradoxical sentence.)

    Gute Umgangsformen schließen Höflichkeit ein. (idiomatic form, example for usage.)

    edit: small sequence and format changes.
     
    I don' know the concept, I am afraid.

    Could you be so kind as to give one or two examples with their proper solution?
    Excuse me my inability to do so; when I show (in my posts of questions on one language) some exemplifying sentences in other languages, somebody (the Forums manager?) deletes the examples-including posts, plus, I fail to think up any examples on the German grammar in answer to your plea. But, if that somebody allows the info below, please see the examples of English and Japanese (Sorry if the messages are too long and bulky!) :
    https://forum.wordreference.com/conversations/february-2022.1616506/#convMessage-1861634
    The answers are in my 7-9th posts in the above conversation.

    By the way, the above (b)'s must have included Leo Weisgerber's "die völkische sprachliche Zwischenwelt," I believe.
     
    Last edited:

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    Das Element a gehört zur Menge A. (Die Menge) A enthält als Element/das Element a".
    Yes, that is the mathematical way to do it.

    Then, would it not be used to solve my original problem?
    With your title sentence this phrasing does not work, unfortunately.

    :thumbsdown: Die Guten enthalten ihn.

    But, "die Guten" is a weird phrasing to start with.

    A sentence that does work:

    Unter den Demonstranten war auch wieder Herbert.
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    What is the antonym of "gehören"?: What verb do you put to fill in the blank of "Die Guten ... ihn." when you want to say the same thing as "Er gehört zu den Guten [Leuten]."? Is it "enthalten," "einschließen mit," or what?
    Was it right to call such semantic relation antonymous? Is there another term for it?
    There is no verbal antonym. You simply insert nicht: Er gehört nicht zu den Guten. Depending on what you want to say, you can use the antonym of the adjective (gut-böse): Er gehört zu den Bösen.
     

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    There is no verbal antonym. You simply insert nicht:
    That's not what he meant.

    He does not look for antonyms but for converses. Exactly this mathematical relation in everyday German:

    X ist ein Element von A.
    A enthält X


    There are semantical converses like this:

    A ist Schüler von B.
    B ist Lehrer von A.

    A ist Vater von B.
    B ist Tochter/Sohn/Kind von A.
     
    Last edited:

    bearded

    Senior Member
    Die Guten schließen ihn ein. - This is blocked in our context because of the homonym jemanden einschließen=to lock in somebody.
    According to WR Dictionary (''include'') einschließen would work in this case, though:
    include [sb] vtr (have as participant)jnd einschließen Vt, sepa
    When the boys play together, they never include their sister.
    Wenn die Jungs zusammen spielen, schließen sie nie ihre Schwester ein.
     

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    Then it's clear that the WRDict. has chosen an example which is not idiomatic
    :thumbsdown: Wenn die Jungs zusammen spielen, schließen sie nie ihre Schwester ein.

    The only way this could be idiomatic is if the context implied the meaning "they never lock up their sister (in her room)". But the meaning "include her in the play" is not possible.

    and contains also a mysterious ''ihre'': the sister of an unknown girl, or do all players (brothers?) have just one sister?
    I understood at least that "die Jungs" must be brothers. Many parents say that about their sons when they talk in plural. So it would be the same one sister to all of them. But yes, the example is weird and misleading in several aspects.
     

    Alemanita

    Senior Member
    German, Germany
    Im gesprochenen Deutsch weiche ich manchmal auf "mit einschließen" aus, damit der Satz eineindeutig bleibt: Wenn ich X mache/sonstiges beliebiges Verb, schließe ich nie meine kleinen Kinder mit ein. Damit ist klar, dass to include gemeint ist.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    ...
    Then it's clear that the WRDict. has chosen an example which is not idiomatic… (and contains also a mysterious ''ihre'': the sister of an unknown girl, or do all players (brothers?) have just one sister?). ;)
    Indeed it seems to be a too literal translation.
    With "mit" it works.

    "Einschließen" might work in the given sense in fitting context.

    Die Aufgabe schließt ein, dass ich das Buch lese, ehe ich es bespreche.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Das hat leider auch eine andere Bedeutung, die es blockiert. (Die wörtlich-bildhafte, dass sie ihn mit ihren Armen umfassen. Wie bei: Seid umschlungen, Millionen ...)

    Es würde wahrscheinlich bei entsprechendem Kontext trotzdem funktionieren. Ganz ausschließen will ich es nicht.

    Mir fällt aber kein Kontext ein, im Moment.
     

    Schlabberlatz

    Senior Member
    German - Germany
    Could we say "Die Guten umfassen ihn"? :confused:
    Daran hatte ich auch schon gedacht, aber es hört sich doch schräg an.
    Das hat leider auch eine andere Bedeutung, die es blockiert. (Die wörtlich-bildhafte, dass sie ihn mit ihren Armen umfassen. Wie bei: Seid umschlungen, Millionen ...)
    Na ja, wenn aus dem Kontext hervorgeht, wie es gemeint ist, dann wird auch nichts blockiert.
    Es würde wahrscheinlich bei entsprechendem Kontext trotzdem funktionieren. Ganz ausschließen will ich es nicht.

    Mir fällt aber kein Kontext ein, im Moment.
    So’n philosophischer Text von – sagen wir mal – Heidegger o. ä. Dem würde ich es zutrauen. Der hat gerne mal schräg formuliert.
     

    Schlabberlatz

    Senior Member
    German - Germany
    As Hutschi said, I would mean the good embrace/enfold him. The meaning include for umfassen is restricted to certain subject nouns, like Gruppe, Klasse, Menge, ...
    Man könnte behaupten: Die Guten sind eine Gruppe, Klasse, was auch immer. Aber letztlich sehe ich es ähnlich wie du und Hutschi. So eine Formulierung wäre wirklich schräg.
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    Man könnte behaupten: Die Guten sind eine Gruppe, Klasse, was auch immer. Aber letztlich sehe ich es ähnlich wie du und Hutschi. So eine Formulierung wäre wirklich schräg.
    Ich sagte das Subjekt muss das Wort Gruppe oder eine ähnliches Wort sein (Klasse, Menge, etc). Es reicht nicht, wenn das Subjekt eine Gruppe bezeichnet. Die Gruppe der Guten umfasst auch ihn wäre z.B. möglich, würde sich aber reichlich gestelzt anhören. Anders ist das wohl nur für Abstrakta, die keine andere Interpretation zulassen. Beispiel: Die reellen Zahlen umfassen e und π.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top