Emergency/Notfall

eno2

Senior Member
Dutch-Flemish
Hello,

<Wir haben eine Notfall>
<We have an emergency>

Are these 3 ways to say it OK? =>

Έχουμε μια κατάσταση έκτακτης ανάγκης
Έχουμε μια έκτακτης ανάγκης
Έχουμε μια περίπτωση

Od course I prefer (to learn) περίπτωση.
ανάγκη makes me think of something totally different.
 
  • Uranya

    New Member
    Greek
    Good evening.

    Έχουμε μια κατάσταση έκτακτης ανάγκης is the correct one.
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    Thank you

    That seems to translate as : an extraordinary incident

    ----------

    Pons gives περίπτωση , for Notfall, which is not correct, because περίπτωση means
    <case occasion instance >(WR)

    ---------

    ανάγκη makes me think of something totally different.
    I'll have to take that back.
    ανάγκη makes me think of, for instance: <έχω ανάγκη για το γελιο: Η γελιο ειναι σπανιο>
    That's NOT different really, because ανάγκη means ' a need'. I need to laugh. It means also: A matter of necessity. (WR)
     
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    Perseas

    Senior Member
    Greek
    Pons gives περίπτωση , for Notfall, which is not correct, because περίπτωση means
    <case occasion instance >(WR)
    Here Pons gives "περίπτωση έκτακτης ανάγκης", for "Notfall". "Fall" is "περίπτωση".
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    Yes.

    The Greek way of saying 'Notfall'/emergency <περίπτωση έκτακτης ανάγκης> strikes me as 'cumbersome'.
    But it is what it is...
     

    dmtrs

    Senior Member
    Greek
    The Greek way of saying 'Notfall'/emergency <περίπτωση έκτακτης ανάγκης> strikes me as 'cumbersome'.
    If you are searching for something 'lighter', "έχουμε/υπάρχει/προέκυψε κάτι έκτακτο" or "έχουμε/υπάρχει/προέκυψε κάτι επείγον" may be what you're looking for.
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    Maybe

    I would have to compare traduced entire phrases (which go along with a certain context) into Greek about the subject, which I will try to do.
    What follows has also to do with emergencies, albeit only medical ones:
    Hospitals in Spain have Urgencias , in Germany that would (supposedly?) be
    Notaufnahme f, In Belgium it's Spoedopname; I don't know for certain what it's called in the UK and in the US, (perhaps 'Emergency'(?)) and in France (SAMU(?)) and in Greece.
     

    dmtrs

    Senior Member
    Greek
    In Greek that is "έκτακτο (περιστατικό)" -the second word frequently omitted by the hospital stuff. The ER (Emergency Room) is "ΤΜΗΜΑ ΕΚΤΑΚΤΩΝ ΠΕΡΙΣΤΑΤΙΚΩΝ" or "ΕΚΤΑΚΤΑ ΠΕΡΙΣΤΑΤΙΚΑ" or simply "ΕΚΤΑΚΤΑ" in Greek hospitals.
     

    Iraklakos

    Member
    Greek, German - Austria
    Actually, the ER in a hospital is most commonly called Επείγοντα
    or Tμήμα Επειγόντων Περιστατικών or simply ΤΕΠ
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    Thanks

    Another way to express 'emergency aid':
    το Εθνικό Κέντρο Άμεσης Βοήθειας (ΕΚΑΒ), National Center for Emergency Aid.

    But I suppose this has nothing to do with hospital emergency service. (?)
     
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    Librarian44

    Member
    Greek
    eno2, it seems to me that the German word Notfall is much more comprehensive as it can indicate both a natural disaster like fires or floods (that would call for a state of emergency) and also an incident like a traffic accident. In Greek you have to differentiate between κατάσταση έκτακτης ανάγκης, which equals state of emergency, and έκτακτο περιστατικό, which would usually refer to a medical emergency. A hospital's emergency service is called Επείγοντα.
    - Λόγω των πυρκαγιών η περιοχή κηρύχτηκε σε κατάσταση έκτακτης ανάγκης (Due to the fires the area was declared in a state of emergency).
    - Το ΕΚΑΒ αντιμετώπισε χθες πολλά έκτακτα περιστατικά (The EKAV dealt with a lot of emergencies yesterday).
    - Ο αδελφός μου είχε ένα τροχαίο (ατύχημα) και έπρεπε να μεταφερθεί στα επείγοντα του νοσοκομείου Ευαγγελισμός (My brother had a traffic accident and had to be transported to the emergency of the Evangelismos Hospital).

    The ΕΚΑV deals with έκτακτα περιστατικά that need to be hospitalized. They provide the ambulance and the staff trained to deal with medical emergencies till they get to a hospital. So, yes, EKAV has to do with hospital emergency.
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    Yes, Notfall and emergency are very general
    Notaufnahme and Urgencias (SPan) , the service, is very specific.
    Thank you for he clarification, all the details and the examples.

    I reread the thread and I take note here of some vocabulary that was given ==>

    κατάσταση έκτακτης ανάγκης = state of emergency.

    As for 'we have an emergency' this would be the simplest way to say it:
    "έχουμε/υπάρχει/προέκυψε κάτι έκτακτο"
    or "έχουμε/υπάρχει/προέκυψε κάτι επείγον"
    As for the medical emergency service of hospitals:
    Επείγοντα for short = a hospital's emergency service
    έκτακτο περιστατικό,= a medical emergency

    But dmtrs said the service 'Notaufnahme (Urgencias in Spanish).....=>
    In Greek that is "έκτακτο (περιστατικό)" -the second word frequently omitted by the hospital staff. The ER (Emergency Room) is "ΤΜΗΜΑ ΕΚΤΑΚΤΩΝ ΠΕΡΙΣΤΑΤΙΚΩΝ" or "ΕΚΤΑΚΤΑ ΠΕΡΙΣΤΑΤΙΚΑ" or simply "ΕΚΤΑΚΤΑ" in Greek hospitals.
    So that's έκτακτο for short...
    :confused:
    That raises the possibility that έκτακτο & Επείγοντα. for short are both used as synonyms. Are they?
     
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    dmtrs

    Senior Member
    Greek
    But dmtrs said [...] "ΤΜΗΜΑ ΕΚΤΑΚΤΩΝ ΠΕΡΙΣΤΑΤΙΚΩΝ" or "ΕΚΤΑΚΤΑ ΠΕΡΙΣΤΑΤΙΚΑ" or simply "ΕΚΤΑΚΤΑ"
    Actually, the ER in a hospital is most commonly called Επείγοντα
    or Tμήμα Επειγόντων Περιστατικών or simply ΤΕΠ
    In fact, Iraklakos' comment is right. This is what you'll find in a Greek hospital:
    "ΤΜΗΜΑ ΕΠΕΙΓΟΝΤΩΝ ΠΕΡΙΣΤΑΤΙΚΩΝ" or "ΕΠΕΙΓΟΝΤΑ ΠΕΡΙΣΤΑΤΙΚΑ" or simply "ΕΠΕΙΓΟΝΤΑ"
    Μy mistake.
     

    dmtrs

    Senior Member
    Greek
    I think it's a good way to convey the meaning, avoiding the word-for-word translation.
    If it CAN wait, it's not an emergency (επείγον).
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    I have no doubt it is, in Greek. . But say that in English and it doesn't work at all here ...
    "Is it an emergency/urgency?
    On the other hand ==> "Is it urgent?" would do nicely.

    But επειγον
    is a noun, says WR, not an adjective...
     

    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    Does WR have it wrong ? No.
    The subtitle was επειγον, not επείγων which indeed translates as 'urgent'. Is επείγων invariable as an adjective? If it's a participle, of what verb then?
    Was the spelling of the subtitle wrong perhaps? The positive reaction of dmtrs does allow for thinking that...

    What also puzzles me is the lack of an accent (acute accent) on επειγον
    Above in the thread, it was written as επείγον.
     
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    διαφορετικός

    Senior Member
    Swiss German - Switzerland
    επείγον is the neuter form of επείγων (you can see this on επείγων - Βικιλεξικό ). And it can be used as a noun, like most adjectives (emergency, urgent letter, ...). I think the subtitle was spelt correctly and its direct translation is "is it urgent?".
    επείγων is the participle of επείγω (= to be urgent), also found as "επείγομαι" (= to be in a hurry).
     
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    διαφορετικός

    Senior Member
    Swiss German - Switzerland
    Every Greek word with more than one syllable should have an accent. In this respect, "επειγον" is wrong.

    Yes under
    Συγγενικές λέξεις
    Well, I meant that you can see it in the inflection table. But the table does not mention explicitly which column is neuter.
     

    Perseas

    Senior Member
    Greek
    But επειγον
    is a noun, says WR, not an adjective...
    In the phrase "επείγον επαγγελματικό θέμα" the noun is "θέμα".
    "Επείγον" can function as a noun, when e.g. a letter or a parcel is marked as such and the Post Office should give priority.
     
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    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    I was strictly talking about the επειγον link I gave from WR, which gives it as a noun, corresponding with the orthography of the
    Greek subtitle translation:
    ειναι επειγον;

    Of course I saw afterwards that επείγων is in WR too (My only free Greek-English dictionary) as an adverb and an adjective. I understand and accept it can take the form of επείγον neutre and that it can function as a noun as such. Scores of adjectives can.

    I'm glad I posted 'ειναι επειγον; so we could discuss it here.
    From what I read , it's an orthographic error...
     
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