Dialectal/Ottoman realization of hard k and g

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clamor

Senior Member
French - France
Hi :)
I wonder whether there are some non standard realizations of /k/ and /g/ in back environments (surrounded by a, ı, o, u).​
I have been taught that /k/ and /g/ have palatal allophones [c], [ɟ] in front environments and velar allophones [k], [g] in back environments in Standard Turkish. But I wondered whether in some dialects (especially in Eastern and Southern Anatolian dialects) or in Osmanli, hard [g] and [k] were pronounced as velar/uvular fricatives [ɣ ~ ʁ] [x ~ χ] or perhaps as uvular stops [ɢ] and [q].​
Maybe it is only with /k/.​
My question has been motivated by some observations. Indeed here are some borrowings in Armenian of Turkish words with a hard /k/ in Turkish. I found that Kurdish borrowings exhibit the same phenomenon.​
baklava → pʰaχlava​
kaplan → ʁapʰlan, χapʰlan
fıstık → fəstəχ
çocuk → t͡ʃʰod͡ʒuχ
(Note that Armenian language has /k/ and /g/ but not /q/).

So does anyone have an idea which could explain this?

Thank you for reading :)
 
  • Rallino

    Moderatoúrkos
    Turkish
    You're correct, and that sound still exists in lazy speech in many regions. You won't hear it in standard TV Turkish. But many people do it to a certain extent in their daily lives.

    That b to pʰ change also occurs, albeit much more rarely, and it's probably more in Kurdish influenced areas of the country, but the χ is quite common.
     

    clamor

    Senior Member
    French - France
    That b to pʰ change also occurs, albeit much more rarely, and it's probably more in Kurdish influenced areas of the country, but the χ is quite common.
    Ok, very intersting, thank you for you reply! Do you have an idea in which regions specifically, or a reference to a book that mentions the phenomenon please? And does the same go with /g/?
     

    messybricks

    New Member
    English
    "hard [g] and [k] were pronounced as velar/uvular fricatives [ɣ ~ ʁ] [x ~ χ] or perhaps as uvular stops [ɢ] and [q].
    Maybe it is only with /k/."

    The Turkish /k/, /ğ/ and /h/ have dialectical variants especially in the East. Turkish is sometimes described as a dialect continuum between Istanbul Turkish and Azerbaijani (Azeri). For specifics and sound recordings, see turkishtextbook.com/pronunciation
     
    • Agree
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