déborder sur

< Previous | Next >

fabfab

Senior Member
French - France
"Nous avons trop de travail, nous ne pourrons pas finir cette semaine : nous allons devoir déborder sur la semaine prochaine."

Can one use "to spill over to the next week"? Is there something else?
 
  • Geir76

    New Member
    Norwegian
    I don't agree. The expression "to spill over" can indeed be used in the context fabfab describes. In fact, just today I bought a wedding card which reads:

    "May your hearts
    overflow with happiness
    so that joy spills over
    into all the days that follow"

    Try googling "spill over into". You'll find its use is not restricted to liquids.
     
    Last edited:

    DearPrudence

    Dépêche Mod (AL mod)
    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    "spill over" might be used figuratively, but I am not sure time can spill over. It does not in your card (joy does).
    The WR dictionary now has a translation for "déborder", but doesn't translate the preposition:

    déborder vi un peu familier (franchir les limites de temps)overrun vi
    run over, go over vi phrasal
    Le cours de maths a un peu débordé parce que la prof voulait finir de corriger un exercice.
    The maths lesson overran a bit because the teacher wanted to finish going over an exercise.

    Any suggestions?
     

    monsieurjoe

    New Member
    USA English
    "spill over" might be used figuratively, but I am not sure time can spill over. It does not in your card (joy does).
    The WR dictionary now has a translation for "déborder", but doesn't translate the preposition:

    déborder viun peu familier (franchir les limites de temps)overrun vi
    run over, go over vi phrasal
    Le cours de maths a un peu débordé parce que la prof voulait finir de corriger un exercice.
    The maths lesson overran a bit because the teacher wanted to finish going over an exercise.

    Any suggestions?
    We have too much work and cannot finish by next week. We will have to carry over/continue/wrap it up next week.
     

    tartopom

    Senior Member
    French
    Um.. I didn't know 'go over' meant 'déborder'. To me it means plenty of things such as
    scan / check / review / do again / clean / rehearse.
     

    OLN

    Senior Member
    French - France, ♀
    Avec le verbe overrun, je me demande aussi.
    - (transitif direct) work will overrun this week's deadline (?)
    - (intransitif) work will overrun into next week (?)
     

    tswsots

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Je pense que je dirais "carry over into next week."

    Mais "spill over" marche! "Overrun?" non, je dirais "run over" plutôt.
     

    moustic

    Senior Member
    British English
    Um.. I didn't know 'go over' meant 'déborder'. To me it means plenty of things such as
    scan / check / review / do again / clean / rehearse.
    You're right about the other different meanings but there's no problem using "go over" for "déborder", e.g. I left the tap on and the water went over the side of the bath.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top