cook/make delicious food

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bennyfriendly

Senior Member
korean
Usually, I hear people say (1) below.

(1) Some restaurants serve delicious food.

Is it okay to replace "serve" with either of the two verbs below?

(2) Some restaurants cook delicious food.
(3) Some restaurants make delicious food.

Thank you very much.
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Clearly the meaning is different: Step 1 is cooking/making the food. Step 2 is serving it.

    Clearly different people do these 2 things:
    Step 1 is done by cooks in the kitchen.
    Step 2 is done by waiters in the dining room.

    Is it okay to replace "serve" with either of the two verbs below?
    That depends on what you mean. Do you mean something that all 3 verbs express? What are you saying with this sentence?
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    It's common in AE to say/hear "I'm making eggs".

    In BE, we don't say that. Here, we say "I'm cooking/frying/boiling/scrambling/coddling eggs".
    It's also common in the US to add the method along with the verb 'make': "I'm making fried/hardboiled/softboiled/scrambled/coddled/poached eggs."
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    We assume that restaurants don't serve food that is made/cooked elsewhere and they don't cook/make food in order to throw it away. People won't know if the food is delicious if it isn't served. A computer would say they are different. People understand them to mean the same thing.

    In BE, we don't say that. Here, we say "I'm cooking/frying/boiling/scrambling/coddling eggs".
    Enjoy your cooked/fried/boiled/scrambled/coddled/poached salad and sushi. ;)
     
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