Chanukah gelt

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Hermocrates

Senior Member
Italian & British English (bilingual)
Ciao a tutti!

Nel periodo tra novembre e dicembre vengono venduti dei sacchetti di monetine di cioccolato rivestite di stagnola dorata.

Nei paesi anglofoni sono conosciuti con il loro nome yiddish Chanukah gelt (o anche Hanukkah gelt; "gelt" vuol dire "soldi") perché in origine regalarli era una tradizione solo ebraica associata alla festa della Chanukah/Hannukkah. Tuttavia l'uso di regalarli si è allargato anche alla festa del Natale (che cade in un periodo vicino), nel qual caso si usa spesso il termine più generico e meno culturalmente connotato "chocolate coins".

So che sono venduti anche in Italia per Natale.

Hanno un nome in italiano? O semplicemente, voi come chiamate questo tipo di cioccolatini a forma di monetina?

Ciao e grazie. :)
 
  • miri

    Senior Member
    Italy/Italian
    Io li ho sempre chiamati "soldi di cioccolato":)
    In genere si appendono all'albero di natale e si mettono nella calza della befana:)
     

    Hermocrates

    Senior Member
    Italian & British English (bilingual)
    Fascinating! So similarly to what happens in English, the term "gelt" is borrowed from Yiddish in the context of Chanukah-related sweets, while it is simply translated into Italian when referring to similar sweets given at other holidays. :)

    Thanks! :thumbsup:
     

    David

    Banned
    The little chocolate coins have as much to do with Chanukah gelt as plastic yule logs have to do with the Holy Rood. Chanukah gelt is a European custom. It (gelt is singular) consists of real coins traditionally given to children as a little present at Chanukah, a minor festival that has been transmogrified in the US and Europe into a wierd sort of un-Christmas. Chanukah gelt is a candy version of gold coins, labeled as Chanukah gelt for sale at the time of the festival, and labeled with other names at other seasons.
     

    Azazel81

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    Alright David, I suppose nobody here wanted to insult the jewish culture. We (in this case Ryenart) were just trying to see if there's an Italian equivalent for "chanukah gelt".

    As far as I know, like Miri said, we just call them "soldi di cioccolato"
     

    Hermocrates

    Senior Member
    Italian & British English (bilingual)
    The little chocolate coins have as much to do with Chanukah gelt as plastic yule logs have to do with the Holy Rood. Chanukah gelt is a European custom. It (gelt is singular) consists of real coins traditionally given to children as a little present at Chanukah, a minor festival that has been transmogrified in the US and Europe into a wierd sort of un-Christmas. Chanukah gelt is a candy version of gold coins, labeled as Chanukah gelt for sale at the time of the festival, and labeled with other names at other seasons.
    I'm sorry David, but I didn't mean to insult anyone or their religious beliefs. Was any of my statements disrespectful to you? If so, please accept my apologies.

    This is a language forum and my intention was simply to inquire about the Italian equivalent of the name of a certain type of confectionery. In my description, I provided as much information as possible, based on the limited sources that are available to me as a gentile. I thought this information might help other members understand what I was talking about.


    EDITED TO ADD:
    I just realized that my original post is written in Italian (as it was targeted at Italian speakers). If this is an inconvenience to you, I will more than happily translate the original post into English for you. This way you may let me know if anything disrespectful was written there, so that I can mend it.
     
    Last edited:

    TimLA

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Fascinating! So similarly to what happens in English, the term "gelt" is borrowed from Yiddish in the context of Chanukah-related sweets, while it is simply translated into Italian when referring to similar sweets given at other holidays. :)

    Thanks! :thumbsup:
    In my opinion, there is nothing in this statement (or thread) that could even be misinterpreted as being minimally offensive.
     
    Last edited:

    David

    Banned
    I didn´t find anything offensive and did not think Jewish culture was insulted by anybody. Not sure why Ryenart apologizes for what was surely a good question. I don´t understand why TimLA notes that there was nothing offensive, as nobody said there was anything was offensive.

    I think some of the answers provided were a little misleading--"the term geltis borrowed from Yiddish in the context of Chanukah-related sweets"--not because anybody had any evil intent. It´s just that the traditional Chanuka gelt and the chocolate "coins" in gold foil--"vengono venduti dei sacchetti di monetine di cioccolato rivestite di stagnola dorata...sono conosciuti con il loro nome yiddish Chanukah gelt ... perché in origine regalarli era una tradizione ... alla festa della Chanukah/Hannukkah--are a recent invention, I suspect largely American. I just thought I would note the difference between the old tradition and the new custom of associating chocolate with Chanukah. I think I understand the Italian OK. And finally, Chanukah gelt is not a religious custom, just a cultural custom of giving a little present to children at the time of a very minor holiday. The gelt used to be gelt, not candy. What´s wrong with clarifying that?
     
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