Caramelle mou

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Hermocrates

Senior Member
Italian & British English (bilingual)
Ciao, amici.

Potete chiarire per me cosa siano le "caramelle al mou", questo misterioso prodotto dell'arte dolciaria? (Non sono neppure sicuro della grafia, ma ho trovato abbastanza riscontri scritti in questo modo, nel caso, correzioni sono gradite)

A prima vista avevo pensato che fossero i "toffees" ma poi ho letto qui che è solo erroneamente che i due prodotti sono confusi tra loro. Ma non ho trovato da nessuna parte cosa sia effettivamente il misterioso "mou".

Cos'è esattamente? :eek: Esiste solo in Italia?
 
  • Liuk99

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Ciao,
    forse la confusione nasce dal fatto che le toffees sono solo morbide, mentre esistono delle caramelle mou anche dure. C'è una marca famosissima qui in Italia, ma credo di non poterla nominare.

    Per me le caramelle mou sono quelle al gusto di caramello. Non sarebbe molto bello chiamarle caramelle al caramello, quindi secondo me il cambio di nome deriva da quello.
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Ciao,
    forse la confusione nasce dal fatto che le toffees sono solo morbide, (No, da noi esistono anche le "hard toffees" :)) mentre esistono delle caramelle mou anche dure.
    Per me le caramelle mou sono quelle al gusto di caramello. Non sarebbe molto bello chiamarle caramelle al caramello, quindi secondo me il cambio di nome deriva da quello.
     

    Hermocrates

    Senior Member
    Italian & British English (bilingual)
    Ciao,
    forse la confusione nasce dal fatto che le toffees sono solo morbide, mentre esistono delle caramelle mou anche dure.
    I'm no expert, really, but aren't toffees hard sweets actually (at least in English)? :confused:
     

    Liuk99

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Qui in Italia non ho mai sentito di toffee dure e anche Wikipedia riporta che le toffee hanno consistenza cremosa, e non dura.
    Poi magari mi sbaglio, ma se mi dici mou a viene in mente il sapore di caramello, non la consistenza della caramella. :)
     

    Hermocrates

    Senior Member
    Italian & British English (bilingual)
    Qui in Italia non ho mai sentito di toffee dure e anche Wikipedia riporta che le toffee hanno consistenza cremosa, e non dura.
    Poi magari mi sbaglio, ma se mi dici mou a viene in mente il sapore di caramello, non la consistenza della caramella. :)
    Per evitare equivoci, "toffee" come lo intendo io è la parola inglese. Non so cosa si intenda in italiano per toffee.

    In inglese si parla di "toffees" per queste. Sono caramelle fatte di caramello o zucchero bollito. Non capisco però la differenza tra queste e quelle che in Italia vengono chiamate "mou". Sono la stessa cosa? Cambia solo la consistenza?
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I'm no expert, really, but aren't toffees hard sweets actually (at least in English)? :confused:
    Like I mentioned, us Brits have both hard and soft toffees (think of a very famous make I can't name: Q....S.....which comes in big tins).

    My grandmother for example preferred soft toffees, but couldn't eat them because they got stuck to her plate (false teeth!;)), so she had to be content with sucking hard toffees instead!:D

    For the sake of curiosity, see history in this link.
     

    Hermocrates

    Senior Member
    Italian & British English (bilingual)
    Like I mentioned, us Brits have both hard and soft toffees (think of a very famous make I can't name: Q....S.....which comes in big tins).

    My grandmother for example preferred soft toffees, but couldn't eat them because they got stuck to her plate (false teeth!;)), so she had to be content with sucking hard toffees instead!:D

    For the sake of curiosity, see history in this link.
    Ha! QS-I know them! My mother's all-time favourite sweets. :D She keeps buttons and other haberdashery bits in the empty tin boxes. Hehe.

    So is "mou" simply the equivant of "soft toffees" (as you mentioned before)?

    What got me confused is that in the page I provided a link to in my first post it is clearly stated that "mou" and "toffees" shouldn't be confused, but it did not explain what "mou" actually is . But perhaps toffee means something else in Italian? (I simply assumed it meant the same as in English...)
     
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    Azazel81

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    So is "mou" simply the equivant of "soft toffees" (as you mentioned before)?

    What got me confused is that in the page I provided a link to in my first post it is clearly stated that "mou" and "toffees" shouldn't be confused, but it did not explain what "mou" actually is . But perhaps toffee means something else in Italian? (I simply assumed it meant the same as in English...)
    No, I don't think so.

    Caramelle al Mou, are a very special type of candies. Like someone else (can't remember who) said, there's a brand here which is very famous, but we can't write it.

    Anyway, they taste of caramel.. because basically they're made of it.

    And like Liuk99 said, they're probably called Mou because it would be weired to call them "caramelle al caramello", so someone made up this "mou" thing.

    I found something interesting though not totally related to candies.. but it's about caramel/mou...

    Have a look: http://www.gustoblog.it/tag/mou
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    So is "mou" simply the equivant of "soft toffees" (as you mentioned before)? I've seen what I refer to as "soft toffees" called "caramelle al mou morbide", for sure. Mou is also a caramel sauce you can make yourself. However, at this stage I'm not sure of anything!
    What got me confused is that in the page I provided a link to in my first post it is clearly stated that "mou" and "toffees" shouldn't be confused, but it did not explain what "mou" actually is . This is from whence the confusion arises! But perhaps toffee means something else in Italian? (I simply assumed it meant the same as in English...) I can't say I've heard it used in Italian (but that means nothing, of course).
     

    Azazel81

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    Just to make it clear: Mou IS a sauce. It's made with caramel. If you google it a bit, you'll find a lot of recipes.;)
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Caramelle al Mou, are a very special type of candies. Like someone else (can't remember who) said, there's a brand here which is very famous, but we can't write it. These "caramelle mou morbide" are what I call soft toffees .
    I found something interesting though not totally related to candies.. but it's about caramel/mou...That's what I meant when I said there's a mou you can make yourself!:)
     

    Azazel81

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    Ookie dookie... sorry Jo :D. I didn't have the time of my life to read the whole thread through... :p.

    Anyway, that's actually what caramelle al mou are made of... so... I don't know...
     

    tsoapm

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    I just found this:
    io faccio il toffee con il latte condensato e mi hanno detto che anche il mou si fa cosi'
    Not sure whether this sheds any light on the matter.
    like Liuk99 said, they're probably called Mou because it would be weired to call them "caramelle al caramello", so someone made up this "mou" thing.
    Would it be too ridiculous to call them caramel toffees?

    Edit: Oh, duh. I have a recipe for caramelle mou from a big name in Itailan confectionery right in front of me. :oops: The ingredients are:

    zucchero semolato
    glucosio/miele
    panna

    Comparing the Wikipedia definitions of toffee and fudge (it came to mind, but perhaps I’m way off), I’d say that the panna actually tipped it in the direction of fudge. Può essere?
     
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    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    Hopefully this will shed some light

    Caramel, Fudge & Toffee - Definitions

    The primary ingredients of these products are sugars, corn syrups, fats and dairy ingredients

    Caramels usually have a smooth, non-grained texture

    Fudge has a short granular texture

    The brown stuff found on the outside of some cookies is not really Fudge

    The US definition of Toffee is a hard candy containing a dairy ingredient (butter, cream, condensed milk etc.)

    In the UK, toffee usually refers to a hard caramel although the term is also applied to hard, sugar based products usually containing nuts.

    An old version of the word toffee was Taffy now out of use except in Walesand in the USA, (Salt Water Taffy)

    Caramels were invented in the USA around the turn of the 19th. century
     

    tsoapm

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Look at the caramel candy here (bottom), caramelle al mou are like this.
    'Caramel mou' is French for fudge (Literally 'soft caramel') so I reckon 'caramelle mou' is some kind of corruption.
    What’s currently shown on that page as caramel candy/milk caramel/cream caramel looks a lot like fudge to me, but at a pinch I think I might equally call them toffees, albeit soft ones. I was thinking that I might have heard of cream caramel, but G**gling it redirects me to ‘crème caramel’, and that’s no help.
    Fudge has a short granular texture
    […]
    In the UK, toffee usually refers to a hard caramel although the term is also applied to hard, sugar based products usually containing nuts.
    Thanks, I’m a bit stuck as far as texture is concerned, since I only have photos. Any Italians care to weigh in on the texture of caramelle mou?

    Nuts? I don’t associate toffee with nuts at all. I think I read that Americans have a thing called “English toffee”, with nuts in. Maybe that’s it.
     

    tsoapm

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Great, thanks. :) I’ve since found definitions of mou that call them morbide and gommose. Since Wikipedia says that “[il toffee] è spesso identificato con il nome di caramella al latte mou, anche se non si tratta proprio della stessa cosa”, I guess I can get away with it.
     

    sorry66

    Senior Member
    English, England
    What’s currently shown on that page as caramel candy/milk caramel/cream caramel looks a lot like fudge to me
    As I said in post # 18, 'cararmel mou' is French for fudge - I've had some! 'mou' means soft as I've indicated. For the French, 'caramel' means toffee, as well as caramel (cooked sugar), and so fudge in French also translates as 'soft toffee'.
    fudge - English-French Dictionary WordReference.com
    I'm pretty sure the Italians have borrowed from the French here and like the French they've fudged the difference between 'soft toffee' and 'fudge'.
     
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