Cantonese: 盆菜

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indigoduck

Senior Member
Canadian English
Hi:

I overheard a conversation on the radio: "呢個周末,我會去食盆菜"

Please advise if i can take this to literally mean "eat a bowl of veggies/eat a vegetarian meal" or whether there is a significance to the meal, and if there is a putonghua equivalent expression.

Thanks in advance.
 
  • OneStroke

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Cantonese (HK)
    No, it's poon choi. Famous HK cuisine. When Emperor Duanzong of Song escaped to Hong Kong (the Mongols were after him), the villagers made this for him and it's been a traditional custom to eat this ever since.
     

    indigoduck

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    No, it's poon choi. Famous HK cuisine. When Emperor Duanzong of Song escaped to Hong Kong (the Mongols were after him), the villagers made this for him and it's been a traditional custom to eat this ever since.
    #1: What is 盆菜 really?

    According to wikipedia:
    Poon Choi is special in that it is composed of many layers of different ingredients. It is also eaten layer by layer instead of "stirring everything up", but impatient diners may snatch up the popular daikon radish at the bottom first using shared chopsticks.

    This sounds like it was meant to be one big bowl, but nowadays, do they separate it into seperate dishes?

    #2: When can i use this term 盆菜 in a sentence?

    Is this a meal you decide to have on the fly as casual as going to the restaurant and just ordering 盆菜 or Chow Mein from the menu?

    ie: "今日我生日呀, 不如嗌盆菜啦"
    ie: "由今朝到而家未食过,i'm so hungry i can eat 10 horses,不如嗌盆菜"

    According to wikipedia:
    "From the 1990s, Poon Choi became popular among urban dwellers and can also be enjoyed at many Cantonese restaurants in the autumn and winter or on special occasions throughout the year."

    Enjoyed in the autumn and winter?

    Is 盆菜 similar to the casual eating hot pot in the winter rather than in the summer?

    ie: "呢几日好冻,不如嗌盆菜,捕下身啦"

    Thanks in advance
     
    Last edited:
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