Bottoms up

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Cracker Jack

Senior Member
How do you say in your language and culture ''Bottoms up?'' It is a practice of taking alcoholic beverages especially beer; drinking, guzzling, swilling in large draughts uninterruptedly until the entire content is consumed. With this, the bottle is inverted, the top plugged to the mouth while the bottom is ''up.''

I know that in Catalunya, it is called Sant Hilari. Can you please confirm? I would also like to know how it is called in Spanish, Eusquera and Galician. And also, if this is practised in your culture. Thanks a lot.
 
  • betulina

    Senior Member
    català - Catalunya
    Cracker Jack said:
    I know that in Catalunya, it is called Sant Hilari. Can you please confirm?
    You're quite right, Cracker Jack! In Catalan we say "fer un Sant Hilari" (to do a Saint... Hilary? -Hilario in Spanish) or "beure (drink) a Sant Hilari". The whole sentence, though, is "Sant Hilari, sant Hilari, :warn: fill de puta qui no se l'acabi" (Sant Hilari, sant Hilari, :warn: son of a bi... who does not end it all up" (or similar...). It rhymes in Catalan.

    I don't know how they say it in Spanish. I think people here say "Sant Hilari", either if they speak Catalan or Spanish.

    Salut! :)
     

    Cracker Jack

    Senior Member
    Thanks diego. Thanks too betulina

    betulina said:
    "Sant Hilari, sant Hilari, :warn: fill de puta qui no se l'acabi"
    Moltes gràcies. Sento que hi ha unes altres coses a part de Sant Hilari. Sé que es una mica vulgar pero graciós. Sempre en volia saver i ara en tinc. Ara puc dir la frase sencera. Gràcies una i altre vegada.
     

    linguist786

    Senior Member
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    There is no phrase for this in Hindi/Urdu/Gujarati, but if, say, I was "forced" to translate it, I'd say:

    Gujarati:

    એકી દોકે પી જવું
    eki dokay pee jawu (literally - "to drink in one go")
    [I don't think this is "standard Gujarati" though (suddhar) - more my dialect (Bharuchi)]

    Hindi:

    रोकना बगैर पी जाना
    Roknaa bagair pee jaanaa (literally - "to drink without stopping")

    Urdu:

    ﺎﻨﺎﺠ ﯽﭙ ﺭﻴﻐﺒ ﺎﻨﮐﻭﺮ
    Roknaa bagair pee jaanaa - (literally - "to drink without stopping")
     

    Etcetera

    Senior Member
    Russian, Russia (St Petersburg)
    'Bottoms up' is usually translated into Russian as Пей до дна! (Pej do dna). It's a rather common exclamation, to my knowledge. I've never heard it from my friends, though - but we don't drink beer.:)
     

    Krümelmonster

    Senior Member
    Germany, german
    When I was in Spain they usually said the phrase: "Arriba, abajo, al centro, a dentro", but I don't know if there is a version that is more similar to the catalan one.
    In Germany you say that you drink "auf Ex". (As Ex rhymes on Sex it's not hard to make up some "poems" like the "fill de p***" one :))
     

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    Japanese:
    ikkinomi
    一気飲み

    Literally, "to drink in one breath." Spectators often cheer the temeritous drinker with, "Ikki, ikki. . ."
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    thaliafan said:
    I don't know how to spell it correctly but phonetically in polish it is:

    Oopsha Doopsha!

    Help please?
    Hi thaliafan,

    I'm afriad this is not exactly as you wrote it, sorry. :(


    Bottoms up would translate into Polish as "do dna" (probably there are other translations as well).

    I have never heard the "upsia dupcia" expression. Could you please tell where did you come it across? Maybe it would fit in some other context. :)


    Tom
     

    xisanibo

    New Member
    Mandarin - China
    In Chinese we say "干杯" (pinyin: gan bei )
    干(gan) means dry
    杯(bei) means the glass
    We use this phrase very often when we are at table.
     

    ILT

    Senior Member
    México - Español/Castellano
    I've heard :rolleyes: that in México we say Hidalgo just like in Spain, as well as ¡hasta el fondo!
     

    anamsc

    Senior Member
    English-SF Bay Area
    In California, we say "Chug!" I've heard "bottoms up" before, but it seems corny to me, like something you would say to a kid.
     

    Hakro

    Senior Member
    Finnish - Finland
    I can't believe that the Finnish expression is still missing!

    We say "Pohjanmaan kautta!"
    - pohja = bottom
    - Pohjanmaa = Ostrobothnia = province in western Finland
    - kautta = via
    So this is a kind of pun: Bottoms up = Via Ostrobothnia.

    Very often the one who suggests to take "bottoms up" asks: "Which way the Jäger troops came (to Finland)?" and all the others answer: "Via Ostrobothnia!" This refers to the Finnish troops that were trained in Germany and came back to Finland via Ostrobothnia in 1917 to fight against Russian forces and the Finnish red troops and to contribute the independence of Finland.
     

    hui

    Senior Member
    Finnish
    I can't believe that the Finnish expression is still missing!

    We say "Pohjanmaan kautta!"
    - pohja = bottom
    - Pohjanmaa = Ostrobothnia = province in western Finland
    - kautta = via
    So this is a kind of pun: Bottoms up = Via Ostrobothnia.

    Very often the one who suggests to take "bottoms up" asks: "Which way the Jäger troops came (to Finland)?" and all the others answer: "Via Ostrobothnia!" This refers to the Finnish troops that were trained in Germany and came back to Finland via Ostrobothnia in 1917 to fight against Russian forces and the Finnish red troops and to contribute the independence of Finland.
    Finns also use the more simple kippis which, according to the etymological dictionary, is most likely derived from German verb kippen ("die Gläser kippen").

    My foreign friends seem to prefer hölökynkölökyn (or hölkynkölkyn) if they are not too drunk to remember or pronounce it. I guess the word is derived from Finnish verb hölkkyä (splash).
     

    sakvaka

    Senior Member
    Finns also use the more simple kippis which, according to the etymological dictionary, is most likely derived from German verb kippen ("die Gläser kippen").

    My foreign friends seem to prefer hölökynkölökyn (or hölkynkölkyn) if they are not too drunk to remember or pronounce it. I guess the word is derived from Finnish verb hölkkyä (splash).
    And finally: there is a saying similar to "bottoms up", vetää perseet olalle :warn:, in colloquial language. Literally it means "to drag the ass on the shoulder". But its actual meaning is something different: "to drink a lot and get drunk".

    And now you all forget this phrase! I've never told about it.
     

    szivike

    Member
    Hungarian
    In Romanian there's
    dă-i de duşcă! - used for beverages that can be drunk at once, lit. in one swallowing, without breathing in-between.
    pană la fund! - until you reach the bottom.
     

    Hakro

    Senior Member
    Finnish - Finland
    In Romanian there's dă-i de duşcă! - used for beverages that can be drunk at once, lit. in one swallowing, without breathing in-between.
    In Romania, are there drinks that can't be drunk in one swallowing? In Finland we've never seen such drinks. In some cases, the swallowing takes more time but it's never interrupted.
     
    Greek: άσπρος πάτος

    Phonetically: aspros[1] patos[2]
    [1]Adj. «άσπρος, -η, -ο» ('aspros, m./'aspri, f./'aspro, n.)-->lit. white, shiny; the colloquial adj. «άσπρος, -η, -ο», has an interesting etymology: It derives from the Byzantine name for the low-value coins of the Empire. Those were called «ἄσπρα» ('aspra, pl. n.), from the Latin aspera, pl. neut. of nummus asper. Asper means something rough, harsh (especially the hand cut coins of the era). In time, all recently cut (and thus shiny) rough coins were called «ἄσπρα».
    [2]«Πάτος» ('patos, m.); Classical masculine noun «πάτος» ('pātŏs)-->init. trodden or beaten way, path, later floor, bottom; derivative of verb «πατέω/πατῶ» (pā'tĕō [uncontracted]/ pā'tō [contracted]) -->to tread, walk, trample
     

    bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    Ad fundum is Latin for to the bottom (fundus = bottom, floor, ground, bed, e.g. of a river, sea). The Czech, Polish and Russian do dna means the same (dno = bottom, ..., of a glass, river, abyss etc.).

    An interesting Latin (class.) expression is:

    cadum faece tenus potare = to drink the jar up to yeast;
     

    mithrellas

    Senior Member
    Spanish & catalan - Catalonia (Spain)
    Además del "Sant Hilari, fill de p.... qui no se l'acabi" catalán o "Hidalgo, Hidalgo, hijo p... el que deje algo" en castellano, hay el típico "arriba, abajo, al centro y pa' dentro" bastante habitual en las bodas, por ejemplo. :)
     

    Ali Smith

    Senior Member
    Urdu - Pakistan
    In Chinese we say "干杯" (pinyin: gan bei )
    干(gan) means dry
    杯(bei) means the glass
    We use this phrase very often when we are at table.
    Doesn't 干 (first tone) mean "to empty"? I know that in the fourth tone it means "to do".
     
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