bistecca di vitello/pollo/etc

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ventodimare

Senior Member
Buongiorno,

Se voglio ordinare una BISTECCA DI MANZO chiedo:
A STEAK ed il cameriere dovrebbe capire. Corretto?

Se voglio ordinare una BISTECCA DI POLLO/VITELLO/ETC, dico: A CHICKEN/VEAL/ETC STEAK?


Grazie e buona giornata
 
  • Ameritaliano

    New Member
    English - USA
    I don't think I've ever heard or seen the term "chicken steak." In the anglophone countries we almost always reserve "steak" for that which comes from the cow.

    There are some very limited exceptions (tuna steak; gammon steak [uk], ham steak [us]).

    In the Southern US, there's "chicken fried steak" which is called this because it's cooked just like how you'd cook scaloppine di pollo -- substituting steak in place of the chicken, and covering it with artery-clogging gravy.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    I don't think I've ever heard or seen the term "chicken steak." In the anglophone countries we almost always reserve "steak" for that which comes from the cow.

    There are some very limited exceptions (tuna steak; gammon steak [uk], ham steak [us]).

    In the Southern US, there's "chicken fried steak" which is called this because it's cooked just like how you'd cook scaloppine di pollo -- substituting steak in place of the chicken, and covering it with artery-clogging gravy.
    Ameritaliano, there are quite a few Google listings for it besides the 'chicken fried steak' you describe. According to this website 'chicken steak' can mean anything from boneless, skinless chicken breasts to minced chicken mixed with bread crumbs, seasoned or unseasoned, then pressed into patties. :)
     

    Ameritaliano

    New Member
    English - USA
    I read pages and pages of hits on Google. I hardly found anything that on further reading wasn't actually something else -- such as chicken fried steak.

    The hits I found on google that really did refer to "chicken steak" were one from Australia, one from Pakistan, and one from a Nando's ad from South Africa. I've never seen "chicken steak" on a Nando's menu here in the UK.

    Since the original writer is located in Canada and her question was about ordering in a restaurant, I think she'd confuse any restaurant staff in North America if she asked for a "chicken steak." At the very least, if she sees such an item on a Canadian restaurant menu, she'll know what it could possibly be.

    Maybe there are some Canadians who can weigh in?
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    I read pages and pages of hits on Google. I hardly found anything that on further reading wasn't actually something else -- such as chicken fried steak.

    The hits I found on google that really did refer to "chicken steak" were one from Australia, one from Pakistan, and one from a Nando's ad from South Africa. I've never seen "chicken steak" on a Nando's menu here in the UK.

    Since the original writer is located in Canada and her question was about ordering in a restaurant, I think she'd confuse any restaurant staff in North America if she asked for a "chicken steak." At the very least, if she sees such an item on a Canadian restaurant menu, she'll know what it could possibly be.

    Maybe there are some Canadians who can weigh in?
    I have noticed discrepancies in the number of Google listings from one country to another in the past, but decided to check them from here anyway. These are just from the first few pages from Google UK.

    Cajun chicken steak. Succulent double breast of tender chicken in Cajun marinade. Link

    Chicken Steak Sandwich with Basil Mayonnaise. Serves 4. Ingredients. 4 small skinless chicken breast fillets; 2 tbsp olive oil; 2 tbsp balsamic vinegar...... Link

    Chicken Steak (double-breasted chicken steak served with mushrooms, tomatoes, peas and chips) Link

    Chicken Steak. Roasted breast of chicken served with fresh vegetables ...
    Link

    These are from Google Canada:

    Chicken Steak and Cheese Melt:
    Ingredients:
    1/4 tsp (1 mL) salt: 1/4 tsp (1 mL) ground pepper: 1 tbsp (15 mL) butter melted: 1 onion, peeled and sliced:8 boneless, skinless chicken thighs or 4 boneless, skinless breasts. Link

    Chicken Steak. 1/2 Chicken lightly breaded and boneless $17.95; à la carte $14.95. Link

    Chicken Steak. Charbroiled marinated boneless chicken breast. $15. Link

    BLACK PEPPER CHICKEN STEAK … $22.95. A grilled Chicken Breast seasoned with whole black Peppercorns Link
     
    Last edited:

    JKiara

    Member
    English - Australia
    I thought you would be interested to know, that in some areas of Australia (like the one in which I live) and even the UK, chicken breasts the size of your hand are sometimes known as chicken steaks. Or more elaborately, chicken breast steaks. It just means a portion or serving of chicken of the aforementioned size. Capisci?
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I have noticed discrepancies in the number of Google listings from one country to another in the past, but decided to check them from here anyway. These are just from the first few pages from Google UK.

    Charles, I checked out the UK sites as well.;) I still think it's an Americanism, although I agree with you that there is no doubt of its now being used in the British Isles (as I mentioned in a previous post). :)

    On some of the sites you've provided a link to here and on others I had a look at, there's very often (not always, admittedly) a clear US influence: you see things like Cajun, hash, french fries, burger...all words imported from the other side of the pond!:) Fair enough: if you're doing US-style cooking, give the stuff US-style names!

    Plus, on some menus they call a dish a chicken steak and then "translate" it into BE (breast of chicken or whatever).;)
    I can't speak for Canada, of course!:)

    Jkiara: capiamo! But if you offered my father a chicken steak, he'd probably do a double-take...this is a fairly recent thing, in my opinion (I'm talking about GB, not Oz, obviously).
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    I thought you would be interested to know, that in some areas of Australia (like the one in which I live) and even the UK, chicken breasts the size of your hand are sometimes known as chicken steaks. Or more elaborately, chicken breast steaks. It just means a portion or serving of chicken of the aforementioned size. Capisci?
    That's why I presume it's called a 'steak' - because it looks like one. Which is why it also only refers to the breast (not the drumsticks etc.), or minced chicken mixed with bread crumbs and then pressed into patties that resemble a steak.
    Plus, on some menus they call a dish a chicken steak and then "translate" it into BE (breast of chicken or whatever
    It might be a translation. It could also simply be another way of introducing a description of how the chicken steak is cooked or served. 'Breast of chicken' is usually followed by something like 'seasoned with whole black peppercorns' or 'served with mushroooms, tomatoes, peas and chips' etc..
    'Chicken fried steak' aside, I think most people would understand a 'chicken steak' to mean a steak that substitutes chicken for beef, or whatever. Even your father, Jo! (after the double take, that is :D)
     
    Last edited:

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Yes, meat eaters here chomp their way through many a lamb chop. But a chop isn't a 'bistecca'; don't Italians call it a 'bracciola' or a 'costoletta'?
    A "braciola" in the South is a large "involtino" cooked in tomato sauce. In the north, when I asked for a "braciola" a few years back, I got a pork chop!:D You learn by your mistakes...;) Have a look at the pics in google and you'll see what I mean.

    Here in the Deep South they call lamb chops "costolette di agnello".:)
     
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