Becher, Tasse, Glas

< Previous | Next >

islandinthesun

Senior Member
India - Hindi
There is a picture in my workbook of a cupboard filled with plates, cutlery, cups, glasses and such. The objects labelled Tassen are regular teacups. Next to them are taller, narrower cups/glasses with handles. I thought they might be Tassen too (a variant maybe), but the book says that they are Becher.
From what I have learned so far, Becher are tubs or cups (ein Becher Joghurt) and do not have handles. This description actually matches the objects labelled Gläser in the picture, as they are a little bit shorter than the Becher, wider, and have no handles.
Is the information in my book correct/in line with common usage? How can one tell between Becher, Gläser und Tassen?
 
  • Kajjo

    Senior Member
    I thought they might be Tassen too (a variant maybe), but the book says that they are Becher.
    Your book is fine, but you are not that wrong either. Both is possible. They can be called Tassen or Becher. Most natives, at least in Northern Germany, tend to call bigger items "Becher" and more traditionally sized teacups "Tassen". However, there is no clear distinction for the bigger, taller ones. Safe to say is that a normal teacup is always a "Tasse" and never a "Becher".

    I suggest to search on the German Amazon website for Becher and Tassen and get a feel for it. Usually, a Becher has no handle and is taller and wide. There are some exceptions like "Kaffeebecher" which can be larger, taller items with handle.

    "Gläser" are made of glass. They come in a huge variety of sizes and shapes. They usually have no handle, otherwise they easily turn into Tassen or Becher.
     

    Frank78

    Senior Member
    German
    To me a "Becher" has no handle. It can be made of procelain, stoneware, metal or plastic.

    "Tassen" have a handle and are most commonly made of porcelain or glass.

    Anything made of glass and does not have the shape of a cup is a "Glas". :D Some "Gläser" have handle, e.g. large beer glasses, some have a base (Fuß in German) like wine glasses.

    So a cylindrical drinking vessel made of metal is a Becher and the same thing made of glass is a Glas.
     
    Last edited:

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    Next to them are taller, narrower cups/glasses with handles. I thought they might be Tassen too (a variant maybe)
    You're right.
    mug
    A mug is a type of cup typically used for drinking hot drinks, such as coffee, hot chocolate, or tea. Mugs usually have handles[1] and hold a larger amount of fluid than other types of cup.
    A "mug" is called "Tasse", too.
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    I agree with Frank and Jean-Claude that mugs are usually Tassen and that Becher typically have no handle.

    Calling larger coffee or tea mugs Becher does occur but I can't confirm that 'most natives, at least in Northern Germany, tend to call [them] "Becher"'. The typical northern expression to distinuish a mug from a cup is for me Pott.
     

    διαφορετικός

    Senior Member
    Swiss German - Switzerland
    How can one tell between Becher, Gläser und Tassen?
    My rules to name a container which is suitable to be lifted to the mouth in order to drink its contents, or which is of similar size (say 1 to 10 dl), but is used to store food:
    1. It consist mostly of glass => "Glas"
    2. It has a handle and consists of porcelain or a similar "stony" material => "Tasse"
    3. It is used for storage and consists of metal => "Dose"
    4. Remaining cases => "Becher"
     

    διαφορετικός

    Senior Member
    Swiss German - Switzerland
    I feel that 'Krug' could be added to the list of terms in the thread title.
    A "Krug" is bigger than a "Tasse". It typically contains at least a liter and is used to distribute drinks to smaller drinking containers ("Tasse", "Glas", "Becher"). ("Bierkrug" is an exception: Germans drink beer directly from the "Bierkrug".)
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    A "Krug" is bigger than a "Tasse". It typically contains at least a liter and is used to distribute drinks to smaller drinking containers ("Tasse", "Glas", "Becher"). ("Bierkrug" is an exception: Germans drink beer directly from the "Bierkrug".)
    Trinkgefäße für Bier und andere alkoholische Getränke aus Glas oder Steingut und mit Henkel (meist mit Fassungsvermögen von 0.5l oder 1l) heißen auch Krug; mit 0.5l oder weniger Fassungsvermögen in AT auch Krügerl.

    masskruege-individuell-bedrucken_600x600.jpgnachtmann-noblesse-kruegerl-set-2-0098855-0.jpg
    Links: Krug, rechts: Krügerl.
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top