beat = "defeat"

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Gavril

Senior Member
English, USA
In many languages, there is a word meaning "beat" (= "hit, strike") that also means "to defeat (an opponent in competition)":

English beat
Spanish batir
French battre
Welsh curo
Finnish lyödä

Are there any other examples?
 
  • jazyk

    Senior Member
    Brazílie, portugalština
    I don't think I've heard bater (to beat) in Portuguese being used as derrotar (to defeat), but my memory may be serving me wrong.
     

    Montesacro

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    In many languages, there is a word meaning "beat" (= "hit, strike") that also means "to defeat (an opponent in competition)":

    English beat
    Spanish batir
    French battre
    Welsh curo
    Finnish lyödä

    Are there any other examples?
    Yes:
    Italian battere (the stress falls on the a)
     
    I do not think we use that in Greek. "To beat" is «κτυπώ» (kti'po) or in vernacular, «χτυπώ» (xti'po), which upholds the exact or primary meaning of the word. Indirectly (and colloquially) though, one can say «με τσάκισε» (me 'tsacise)-->I was smashed/cracked [by him/her], or «τσακίστηκα» (tsa'cistika)-->I've been smashed/cracked. From the onomatopoetic verb «τσακίζω» (tsa'cizo), from «τσακ» (tsak), the brisk, sharp, cracking sound (similar to English "snap").

    [x] is a voiceless velar fricative, known as the hard ch
    [c] is a voiceless palatal plosive
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    This is not quite standard Russian, rather archaic, or high-flown, or ironic, but you won't hear it, say, in a news report.
    True, but degree of formality is another matter, I believe; the fact is that such a meaning exists and is in use.
     

    nimak

    Senior Member
    Macedonian
    In many languages, there is a word meaning "beat" (= "hit, strike") that also means "to defeat (an opponent in competition)"
    In Macedonian too.

    тепа (tepa) ['tɛpa] v. 3rdp.s. = beat, kill, defeat, fight
     
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