Arrebatar (culinary)

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lordmikau

New Member
Spanish - Mexico
Hi everyone! Does anybody know if an equivalent of the culinary term "arrebatar" exists in English? Its definition is "a badly cooked item that has been burnt on the outside but remains uncooked on the inside." Thanks very much!
 
  • cidertree

    Senior Member
    English - Ireland
    Many cooking sites will tell you how to avoid this but I have never seen it described as other than "burnt on the outside, raw inside. With steak there is a style called Pittsburgh rare but this refers to heavy charring rather than burnt and the level of "doneness" can vary.
     

    x.y.z

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain
    Arrebatar
    Cooking

    (without cooking the inside properly) to burn … on the outside

    fuente: lexico.com
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    Its definition is "a badly cooked item that has been burnt on the outside but remains uncooked on the inside."
    The DRAE doesn't include that last part.

    Dicho de un alimento: Asarse o cocerse mal y precipitadamente por exceso de fuego.

    Given the above definition, I would just say "the food was burnt," although of course it would vary with the exact context. If, however, you want to express the second part, then cidertree's "burnt on the outside, raw [on the] inside" or a variation thereof is the closest we have.
     

    lordmikau

    New Member
    Spanish - Mexico
    Thanks guys! It's for a translation of a term base so I'm in a kind of awkward position. But yeah I don't think a specific term exists so we'll have to describe it. Thanks!
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    Here's an option to consider: to sear.

    My mother used to make pot roast by getting the pan very hot and then putting a piece of meat in to sear it. The outside of the meat would be dark brown or nearly black, but the inside would still be uncooked. This seals the juices inside the meat. She then cooked the meat very slowly on the inside.
     

    cidertree

    Senior Member
    English - Ireland
    Here's an option to consider: to sear.

    My mother used to make pot roast by getting the pan very hot and then putting a piece of meat in to sear it. The outside of the meat would be dark brown or nearly black, but the inside would still be uncooked. This seals the juices inside the meat. She then cooked the meat very slowly on the inside.
    It sounds delicious but this would be a deliberate and well controlled technique and wouldn't result in the "badly cooked item" that the OP mentions.
     
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