Are English speakers lazy?

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Tinska

Member
Spanish - Argentina
Europe seems very submissive to me. They don't even use the native language in their country anymore. Everything is "Anglo-Saxonized", even Eurovision has English.
I would dislike to visit Spain or Portugal and their population speak only English to me by pressures of the European Union.
 
  • Pedro y La Torre

    Senior Member
    English (Ireland)
    Europe seems very submissive to me. They don't even use the native language in their country anymore. Everything is "Anglo-Saxonized", even Eurovision has English.
    I would dislike to visit Spain or Portugal and their population speak only English to me by pressures of the European Union.
    Euh, what? :confused:
     

    TheCrociato91

    Senior Member
    Italian - Northern Italy
    Europe seems very submissive to me. They don't even use the native language in their country anymore. Everything is "Anglo-Saxonized", even Eurovision has English.
    I would dislike to visit Spain or Portugal and their population speak only English to me by pressures of the European Union.
    What are you on about? No one is forced to speak English in Italy or any European country that I know of. Or even to sing in English at Eurovision, since you've mentioned it.
     

    Red Arrow

    Senior Member
    Dutch - Belgium
    Europe seems very submissive to me. They don't even use the native language in their country anymore. Everything is "Anglo-Saxonized", even Eurovision has English.
    I would dislike to visit Spain or Portugal and their population speak only English to me by pressures of the European Union.
    The EU doesn't force any language on anyone. In fact, every language is treated equal. EU laws are translated to all EU languages and none of them is considered the source material.

    When I went to Prague and Budapest, pretty much no one could understand English. It is not true that the EU forces English on everyone.

    In Wallonia, many children don't even learn English in school. They only have to learn one foreign language, and schools can choose between English, Dutch and German.
     
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    eno2

    Senior Member
    Dutch-Flemish
    English: I's Lingua Franca, That's all.

    [QUOTE="Red Arrow, post: 18424441, member: 756675

    In Wallonia, many children don't even learn English in school. They only have to learn one foreign language, and schools can choose between English, Dutch and German.
    [/QUOTE]
    :confused: Of course they mostly choose for English and rightly so.
    French is still the obligatory first foreign language in Flanders. Belgium is 'bilingual country' but the Walloons are indeed left a free choice, the lucky bastards... Since Brexit I would have opted for.... German:(. English you can learn spontaneously by simple ubiquitous exposure...
     
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    Red Arrow

    Senior Member
    Dutch - Belgium
    Almost 40% of Wallonia doesn't pick English. Tinska makes it look like the EU makes English obligatory, that is simply not the case.
     

    Amapolas

    Senior Member
    Castellano rioplatense
    Europe seems very submissive to me. They don't even use the native language in their country anymore. Everything is "Anglo-Saxonized", even Eurovision has English.
    I would dislike to visit Spain or Portugal and their population speak only English to me by pressures of the European Union.
    You haven't been to Buenos Aires lately, have you? Everything sounds better ('trendy') if it's 'anglicised' here, especially in certain neighbourhoods. Even if they don't know what they're saying or how to make the grammar work. The other day I spotted the following in big letters in a shop window: 'SALE - 20% OFF DE DESCUENTO'. Such fun.
    Anyway, as Eno says, English is a lingua franca. And it's good it works as such, or we'd have to learn a new language every time we travel to a new country.
     

    Rodal

    Banned
    Castellano (Chile)
    I am interested to know whether people from other countries view the English attitude towards learning language as lazy? Being from England myself, I do think this is the case. It used to be compulsory that students learnt at least one language up until the age of 16, but this has been changed and they can drop it at just 13. (Most only begin learning at 11). Whenever I go abroad, I am in awe at how much better people's English is, than their English counterparts would be at their language. Do you think this is because people begin learning languages at a younger age in other countries, or because they're exposed to more English than we are to other languages or is it the arrogance of English speakers?
    When my dad told his friend that I was studying languages at university, he replied, "Why that's not very useful - everyone speaks English."
    I wouldn't call them lazy, I would call them too comfortable in their own skin. It used to be that no one would even answer you back if you had the slightest accent in Seattle, the only response you would get was "what?"; now with the new immigration we've had in recent years society has become more accepting of accents and more adaptable to people who don't speak English. There are more TV shows and even movies where movie stars are allowed to star in the movie despite their heavy accent. English people have had the privilege being able to get everything in their own language, now with the globalization of everything the market has extended to China, Latin America, the middle East, India, and the whole world has become a consumer of goods, some of which are now being made in their own country, so this globalization of commerce and international consumer demand has opened the door to more opportunity in international business where more than one language is needed, same in the medical and legal fields where you need an interpreter for every patient who doesn't speak the language. So, I don't think English speaking people where lazy in the past, it's just that the world is changing and having to speak a second language was just not as necessary as it is today.
     

    Tinska

    Member
    Spanish - Argentina
    You haven't been to Buenos Aires lately, have you? Everything sounds better ('trendy') if it's 'anglicised' here, especially in certain neighbourhoods. Even if they don't know what they're saying or how to make the grammar work. The other day I spotted the following in big letters in a shop window: 'SALE - 20% OFF DE DESCUENTO'. Such fun.
    The anglicisms that exist in Buenos Aires is a question of marketing, where several local purchases do it. If you approach the employee asking in English, he won't even know how to answer.
    It's very different from Europe, where every year Eurovision has its English songs, people attend their tourists in English, and their universities use English.
    I have read this controversial text about the Dutch language. I'm not going through the branches of linguistic nationalism or anything. By the way, Red Arrow made me clear.
     

    Red Arrow

    Senior Member
    Dutch - Belgium
    I have read this controversial text about the Dutch language. I'm not going through the branches of linguistic nationalism or anything. By the way, Red Arrow made me clear.
    Even if all languages of Europe were to disappear besides 2, then Dutch would still survive. It would be one of those two.

    The Dutch language has never been this strong in Flanders. Elementary schools used to be French-only. Teachers punished children for speaking Dutch. Some pastors called Dutch the language of the devil. The current popularity of English is nothing in comparison. Most of our life is now in Dutch.

    There is still popular Dutch music, from rap to schlager: Bazart, Bløf, Gers Pardoel, Lil' Kleine, De Romeo's etc.
    Sometimes the Flemish Top 50 has more Dutch songs than the Walloon Top 50 has French songs.
     

    Antarte

    Member
    Mexican Spanish
    Everyone is lazy. Usually people don't like to learn... anything (not only languages). Learning is a tedious process which gives back great rewards, but still tedious. So people usually spend the mos precious we have (our time), to learn useful things.

    If you 'need' to learn a language (because you live in that country), that is useful for you. But if you already speaks the most useful language in the world, living in an country in which that is the common language, you don't have that necessity, and won't have a big reward (won't be using that new language very often in your life). Unless it is a hobby, or your profession, to learn those languages (you like, as people like to see movies for example, or if your profession is related to languages).

    I'm native Spanish speaker, having the immense luck to grew up in a bilingual school, and even with that advantage, I remember was 'tedious' to learn more English than the necessary. Videogames and science papers was my main reason to learn English (my reward). Now I can read and understand well most of the internet. English as second language is not always an 'interest' more than a necessary tool.
     
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