All Slavic languages: coffee grounds

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Encolpius

Senior Member
Hungarian
Good morning friends, what do you call coffee grounds in your language? I am mostly interested in colloquial term like the Czech: lógr (from the German word Lager). Thank you in advance.
 
  • Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Oh, I think we need some definition here: coffee grounds or coffee dregs = black wet mass left behind at the bottom of a cup after you drink your cup of coffee
     

    jasio

    Senior Member
    Oh, I think we need some definition here: coffee grounds or coffee dregs = black wet mass left behind at the bottom of a cup after you drink your cup of coffee
    Ooops... a misunderstanding then, sorry.
    In Polish it's "fusy" or "fusy z kawy" if you need to be precise, as the word may be applied also to leftovers of tee, herbs, etc.
     

    Panceltic

    Senior Member
    Slovenščina
    zoc in colloquial Slovenian. It sounds like it's borrowed from German, but I'm not sure.

    The official word is (kavna) usedlina, connected with the verb usesti (se) = to sit down, settle.
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Good morning friends, what do you call coffee grounds in your language? I am mostly interested in colloquial term like the Czech: lógr (from the German word Lager). Thank you in advance.
    In Russian it's (кофе́йная) гу́ща, lit. "coffee thick". The only term I am aware of.
     

    jasio

    Senior Member
    The official word is (kavna) usedlina, connected with the verb usesti (se) = to sit down, settle.
    Sounds like a cognate of the Polish "osad" which comes from the verb "osadzać się" (a similar verb "osiadać" can also be used in some cases) with similar meanings of settling down, sedimienting, forming deposits etc. to the Slovenian verb (with an exception for sitting down of a person). The noun itself refers to various kinds of sediments and deposits in geology and engineering (including filtration - so substances similar to the coffee grounds), and to brown traces of coffee or tea on a dirty glass or a cup - but not to the thick layer of leftovers at the bottom.
     

    Panceltic

    Senior Member
    Slovenščina
    Sounds like a cognate of the Polish "osad" which comes from the verb "osadzać się" (a similar verb "osiadać" can also be used in some cases) with similar meanings of settling down, sedimienting, forming deposits etc. to the Slovenian verb (with an exception for sitting down of a person). The noun itself refers to various kinds of sediments and deposits in geology and engineering (including filtration - so substances similar to the coffee grounds), and to brown traces of coffee or tea on a dirty glass or a cup - but not to the thick layer of leftovers at the bottom.
    (U)sesti (se) is the direct cognate to (u)siąść (się), also (u)sedati (se) and (u)siadać (się). (I'm not sure if all the permutations are actually possible in Polish - in Slovenian we have sesti, usesti se, sedati and usedati se). All forms can refer to sitting down (as a person), but only the ones with u- work for sediments like in geology or indeed our coffee example.

    Osadzać się reminds me more of usajati se (the forms agree as far as the iotated d is concerned) which means "to be grumpy and bark at people", at a glance it seems connected with saje in the chimney, always in the plural (cf. Polish sadza) which is a kind of sediment as well. I guess the motivation is that an annoyed person will spout out his complaints like soot is falling out of a chimney.
     
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