All Nordic languages: position of adverbs (manner-place-time)

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Nino83

Senior Member
Italian
Hello everyone.

Excuse me if I write in English but I don't speak Northern Germanic languages.

I read on a book that the usual, neutral, word order of adverbs is manner-place-time, but I'm not sure about it. Can you confirm this?

Are correct these sentences?

(he goes to Stockholm by car today)
hann fer með bili til Stokkhólms í dag
han går med bil till Stockholm idag
han går med bil til Stockholm idag

(I bring the book to your house by car today)
ég færi bókina með bili til þíns húss í dag
jag bringar boken med bil till din hus idag
jeg bringer boken med bil til din hus idag

Thank you!
 
  • vthebee

    Senior Member
    English- Ireland
    I meant that the word order in itself is correct. The actual choice of words in your two examples is a different story, but that was not the issue.
    If I am allowed to ask this question in this thread, what word choices would you have replaced?
    Å reise instead of å gå?
    Takk
     

    myšlenka

    Senior Member
    Norwegian
    If I am allowed to ask this question in this thread, what word choices would you have replaced?
    Å reise instead of å gå?
    Takk
    I can only speak for Norwegian (which is the one you probably are interested in).
    Han kjører til Stockholm i dag.

    As for the second sentence, it depends on the context but, in general I'd skip the by-phrase and replace bringe with levere/ta med alongside other changes.
     
    Last edited:

    raumar

    Senior Member
    Norwegian
    "Han kom hit med bil" is better in that case. If you write "med bilen", it means that he arrived in a specific car.

    By the way, "han går med bil" (from your first post) means "he walks by car".:)
     

    Nino83

    Senior Member
    Italian
    "Han kom hit med bil" is better in that case. If you write "med bilen", it means that he arrived in a specific car.

    By the way, "han går med bil" (from your first post) means "he walks by car".:)
    Thank you, raumar.
    Yes, about "gå" I was told the same thing in a similar topic in the German forum. :)
    I didn't use the verb "drive" because I wanted to put three different adverbs (manner, place, time) in the same sentence and I picked up the first verb in the dictionary but with that verb the sentence doesn't make sense.
     
    Last edited:
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