Aleā sensus

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satirikon

New Member
Czech
Hi latin forum!

My latin is really poor, just managed to investigate a bit from library resources.

How would you translate ´Order out of Chaos´ to latin: Aleā sensus? (Could work as ablative without preposition?)

What would alea sensū or aleā sensū possibly mean?

It is possible to inverse noun and adjective(or similar) in latin, aleā sensus = sensus aleā?

Thanks a lot!
 
  • Scholiast

    Senior Member
    A warm welcome to the Latin Forum for satirikon!

    I can't quite understand what you are trying to do with 'alea' ('die', as in a gaming toy) and 'sensus' ('feeling', 'perception', 'awareness').

    My suggestion: Ex Chao Ordo. ('Chaos' is a loan-word in Latin, from Greek, and I don't think I've found it in any classical author in the ablative, but that hardly matters).

    Ideally we'd need more context: this looks as if it is trying to be a motto or a slogan for a tattoo or something like that. Perhaps satirikon could enlighten us further.

    Σ
     

    satirikon

    New Member
    Czech
    Thank you, Scholiast!

    I´m glad to receive your message. Not a tattoo :D but a brand name. Actually, it ´s my partners idea, who´s looking for a name for his project: Mindfulness classes, and he loves the word alea (also luck, fortune), which represents for him the aleatory nature of life or being. ´Aleatorius´ exists, as expected, and it would be possibly derived from ´alea´, but it doesn´t sound very nice. ´Sensus´- sense, reason. As in ´stricto sensu´.

    It should mean: Sense you create from chaos.

    (P.S. He says Ex Chao Ordo sounds like a sect:)

    Greetings,;)
     

    Snodv

    Senior Member
    English - Mid-Southern US
    Greetings,
    Butting in, but alea doesn't mean "chaos" at all. Of course it means a die or a dice game, but the "fortune" sense has more the connotation of risk or uncertainty, as we might say in English "a toss of the coin." My dictionary cites your adjective aleatorius as pertaining to dicing in aleatoria damna, "gambling losses." And I don't think sensus means "reason" in the sense (haha) of rationality.
    Actually it would be hard to beat Scholiast's Ex Chao Ordo for the meaning you seek.
     

    satirikon

    New Member
    Czech
    Thank you Snodv and Bearded for your new ideas, it' s really intriguing to investigate the symbolic meaning of these words and the shift in meaning they can have in different language. As we do not speak latin we can only indirectly guess if the 'alea' concept could work here. In Latin-Spanish diccionary, alea is listed as 'azar'.

    Greetings!
     

    Snodv

    Senior Member
    English - Mid-Southern US
    Yes, my source says so too: English from French from Spanish azar, from Arabic yásara, defined as "he played at dice."
     
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