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  • amuro

    New Member
    Chinese English
    Try to pronounce "A I U E O" first~ according to romajin list,shall be pronounced as FU, which is combine by a surd "F", and a vowel " U "~

    "U " shall be pronounced as " oo ", eg. w"oo"d, c"ou"ld, but shorter and lighter~~

    " F " shall be pronounced as a casual surd " F " , eg. "f"ine

    "FU" == FOO, thats correct, just try to treat this combination as 1 surd, try to make it little more...fluent...rather than pronouncing as "FOO" -T ( try not to let your upper teeth reach down to underlip when you pronounce it )
     

    Sergin

    Member
    Chinese
    Thanks, because of は ひ ふ へ ほ is known as ha hi hu he ho
    I'm confused by the symbol, cuz I hear that ナイフ(knife) sounds "fu" sound.
     

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    Thanks, because of は ひ ふ へ ほ is known as ha hi hu he ho
    I'm confused by the symbol, because I hear that ナイフ(knife) sounds "fu" sound.
    Please use standard language (as opposed to chat-speak) in all posts in these fora (#22; cf. Rules).

    It is impossible to describe ふ with "English pronunciation standard" because the consonant is not used in English. Though it has two transliterations («hu», «fu»), they refer to the same ふ. All «h» becomes a sort of «f» before «u», and there is no English «f» in Japanese (unless you are very meticulous about reproducing the sound for loan words).

    Now, the consonant in ふ is [ɸ] or bilabial fricative. Air current goes out of the mouth through almost-closed lips. The lips are quite flat anticipating the unrounded Japanese /u/.
     

    palomnik

    Senior Member
    English
    Sergin, maybe the confusion is because there is a (pretty much substandard) variant Romaji where ふ is transliterated as "hu." This was originally designed to maintain phonemic uniformity (i.e., ha, hi, hu, he ho vs. ha, hi, fu, he, ho), because Japanese f is an allophone of h, but it's more confusing than anything else, at least for foreigners learning the language.

    As Flaminius says, it's a bilabial fricative. Purse your lips and blow air through them, which is different from an English or Chinese f, where your upper teeth touch your lower lip.
     

    kaori

    Member
    Japan/Japanese
    Sergin, I understand your confusion. Actually I believed I could perfectly pronounce "h" but later I realized for most Japanese,including me, it is hard to distinguish "hood" from "food".:p
    Japanese ふ is introduced as "hu" (I think it's just because it is easier to make a phonetic matrix) but the real pronouneciation is "fu".
     

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    But, kaori, the real pronunciation is not [f]! Perhaps you saying the notation «f» is better for transcribing Japanese ふ? :confused:

    [F]or most Japanese, including me, it is hard to distinguish "hood" from "food".
    This is so because both English words are loaned into Japanese as [ɸɯːdo].

    The phoneme /f/ uses the lower lip and the teeth for articulation whereas only the lips participate in producing the Japanese ふ. Or at least that is the standard in my neck of the wood (South Kantō).
     

    kaori

    Member
    Japan/Japanese
    The phoneme /f/ uses the lower lip and the teeth for articulation whereas only the lips participate in producing the Japanese ふ. Or at least that is the standard in my neck of the wood (South Kantō).
    You are right. The pronunciation of Japanese ふ is not same as [fu].
    (I'm from Kantō too).


    This is so because both English words are loaned into Japanese as [ɸɯːdo].
    By the way, I see the last part your sentence as "[ɸɯːdo]". Do I have to setup something?
     
    Thank you, Flaminius, for your detailed explanation. I have been wondering about this. I knew it wasn't the "f" sound, but I didn't know what it was called.

    My sister laughed at me once when I was back home in Japan because I called a fork "foku" (with a long "o"...how do you type it???). She said I sounded American. Blah.
     
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