Érezzem magam hibának

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  • Zsanna

    ModErrata
    Hungarian - Hungary
    Hello Gerry905,

    Your sentence is not a very current expression, sounds more like a joke "made up" for an occasion.
    Please, note that the suffix -nak/-nek is not used exclusively to mark the Dative, as it is the case here.

    Nevertheless, the use of this suffix here is a typical one: it is needed as a part of an expression. (Like e.g. "to" in look forward to something in English which does not appear in the same meaning as in "I wrote a letter to him".)

    The verb érezni appears in this construction: "érezni magát valaminek" (= consider oneself something) so your sentence could be translated as: Shall I consider myself as* a mistake?
    The same construction could also be used in a less figurative sense like in: betegnek/gyengének/erősnek stb. érzem magam (= I feel ill/weak/strong, etc.)

    See also this thread.

    Edit: * as is probably my mistake in the translation (on second thoughts) It is not needed, is it?
     
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    Gerry905

    Senior Member
    U.K.
    Thanks. It is a translation of an English song into Hungarian.

    The full English sentences read: Do you want the real smile or the one I practised not fo feel like a failure. the Hungarian translation for that sounds like this: Akarod az igazi mosolyt vagy azt amit gyakoroltam, hogy ne érezzem magam hibának. Is that a correct translation?
     

    AndrasBP

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Thanks. It is a translation of an English song into Hungarian.
    Who came up with this translation? It doesn't sound idiomatic to me. Where did you find it?
    OK, so it is 'hibának', not 'hibásnak', but 'hiba' is not a good translation for 'failure'. 'Hiba', like Zsanna said, is a 'mistake'.

    Could you provide more context, please, so we don't have to do guesswork?
     

    Zsanna

    ModErrata
    Hungarian - Hungary
    I don't think it matters really who did the translation.
    Whatever solution there is for "not to feel like a failure" could still involve the same expression I mentioned above (with -nak/-nek) and if not, it could also be a question for a new thread (especially if another expression came up with the translation). ;)
     
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    Gerry905

    Senior Member
    U.K.
    What I wanted to find out was whether the translation was done by a native Hungarian speaker.
    Yes, it was.

    I don't think it matters really who did the translation.
    Whatever solution there is for "not to feel like a failure" could still involve the same expression I mentioned above (with -nak/-nek) and if not, it could also be a question for a new thread (especially if another expression came up with the translation). ;)
    After a bit of googling, what I understood is that you always use the adjective/noun in the dative, when you're feeling a certain way. Is that correct?
     

    Zsanna

    ModErrata
    Hungarian - Hungary
    Yes, Gerry, "érezni magát valaminek" could also be translated "to feel a certain way". :thumbsup: (As in my examples in post no. 2.)
     

    tomtombp

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Yes, it was.
    Strange. We would never say that. It sounds like a word-for-word translation to me.

    “Hibásnak“ would make more sense as AndrasBp stated even thought it means something slightly different, "at fault“.

    If I had to translate “I feel like a failure“ I'd say “úgy érzem kudarcot valottam“ or “egy csődtömegnek érzem magam“.

    I think your original question has been answered though. "I feel myself like something“ = “Valaminek érzem magam.“
     
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    Fredsky

    Member
    USA
    Hungarian
    Azt hiszem, az eredetinek a jelentése az az, hogy "ne érezzem magam hibának (amit te elkövettél volna azzal, hogy velem voltál)". Hogy én egy hiba voltam, amit te elkövettél. Then the English translation would be something Iike this: Do you want the real smile or the one I practised so as not to feel like a mistake (that I could have been for you). I think this perhaps makes a bit more sense, considering the context, but clearly it is not Shakespeare.
     
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